Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and the Intubated Neck Syndrome

Here i go again, haranging on this subject…it seems to be the top offender on my list of acquired iatrogenic traumas of the head and neck (#2 and #3 i will reveal in future posts) it might just be as dangerous as the all time top accidentally acquired sudden deceleration injuries of the neck from car accidents and falls…it is insidious because in the long term, it leads to a deranged structure that eventually influences our metabolism and how our body functions on a day to day basis and it just goes downhill from there. It is pernicious in that the patient may or may not have neck pain, maybe just chronic tension as a warning symptom. This week one of my patients reminded me that I stabilized her thyroid hormone levels just with osteopathic treatments. The reason I completely forgot about that is because another healthcare provider was monitoring her blood levels, and he was flummoxed as to how she was able to do it…so while we were in a treatment for a completely different reason (pelvic issues) i shared with her my recent discovery of the Intubated Neck Syndrome and my rationale for why it can eventually lead to Hashimoto’s. The gland is a very delicate tissue. It is adhered to the front of the neck and it can be felt just underneath the skin of the neck. Where does it get its blood supply? certainly not through the front…the answer is that it is fed from…underneath…so there are branches off the carotid arteries that flow in front of the neck and they pierce the underside of the thyroid gland that just sits right on top of it. so any injury that causes that neck to hyperextend will actually kink those blood vessels. over time, that poor gland is choking and struggling to survive…it starts to sputter in its function…i actually think that Hashimoto’s is probably on the rise. Why? The neck is a delicate structure that has no external bracing of support. Any sort of injury will almost always cause hyperextension. Very rarely do i ever see hyperflexion injuries of the neck. It is the very nature of the 7 neck bones stacked one on top of the other that leads to this problem and life in general. i see hyperextension injuries also in spinning, cycling, sitting at a desk, sitting at a computer screen, adults delivered by forceps as infants, falls to the tailbone, dental work, hair salon, lets not forget the intubations. although these are injuries that cause an upward shear of tissues, even downward gravitational drags on the neck from pregnancies, weight gain and aging can throw off the balance of tensions to affect the blood supply…how many of you out there know people who have at least 1 of theses types of injuries? i would venture to guess that we all have had some form and combinations of these injuries, which means we all have varying degrees of neck hyperextension…which means everyone in the world is potential sufferers of the consequences of neck hyperextension when i address the neck, my patients feel better, their head feels lighter, why shouldn’t their thyroid recover over time as well? I am treating a new patient with only half a thyroid gland, the other half was taken because it had too many nodules. She had surgery several years ago and is on synthroid (18 surgeries, so far, is her lifetime total). She asked that I blog about my theory so that others who are still searching may be helped…despite all the exercising, it is the insidious metabolic changes that makes Hashimoto’s so tough for patients. you feel like you do not have any control over what is supposed to be your body…i believe my words will resonate with many of you sufferers out there…seek osteopathic treatment…
ADDENDUM: If you want to take a look at some great before and after treatment photos, i have the new beverly hills website at http://www.holisticpaindoc.com

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2 Comments on “Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and the Intubated Neck Syndrome”

  1. saraannon Says:

    All true, and yet another factor to consider is that fluoride used to be the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism as it suppresses thyroid function by replacing iodine in the gland. Now that it is in municipal water supplies and toothpaste everywhere hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s are endemic.


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